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About Literature / Student Member Ryan AdamsMale/United States Groups :iconlamplight-quill: Lamplight-Quill
In our words, we live on
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Hello, everyone. It's me again with a bit of a warning. Not necessarily an excuse, but an explanation. I'm currently working on my first novel (the first chapter is almost complete), and I haven't had the time and concentration required to work on anything else. If anything, I'll likely work on other projects on the weekends when I don't have any classes to swallow up the majority of my day. So, just giving you all fair disclosure on why I may not be so active around the site. Let's hope that this thing gets done soon, and with ample quality to spare.
Well, guess I need to make this short. I'm heading to the Cardfight!! Vanguard Regionals event tomorrow, and I'm willing to accept all challengers who dare approach me, in both words and waged mental combat. So come one! Come all! See if you can take me down. I've got nothing to lose, after all.
A dancer is not water. It's not because they aren't
Fluid – they're nothing if not fluid – but they have a
Form. A series of steps, twists and turns in resulting in
A masterpiece. Some may call it art. I call it a building plan.
And it can be beautiful, make no assumptions that
I'm saying it can't. What I am saying is that
If you're looking for water, go talk to the walkman.

He isn't made of wiring and plastic, but he'll still
Play music, if you can share the tun. He never really has
A destination, but he's always got someplace to go.
Like a loose Brick picked out of the cement filling its cracks
He doesn't go with everyone else. He belongs on the earth,
Tumbling and taking step after step till the only one's left
Are those at the foot of his grave. He's restless; like the trigger
Of a marathon revolver he seeks to be let go. He's not sure
Where he'll go, but he doesn't care. He's the kind of guy that
Never cuts his hair because he thinks that the moment he brushes
The curl out of his face makes seeing what he's seeing all the more
Special. Because curing obscurity with the vaccine called clarity
Is the only thing that makes him stop walking.

He doesn't talk about what he sees. He merely tells people he meets
"Come walking with me, and you'll see what I've seen."
The Walkman
Hello, everyone! I've got some more poetry for you that happened to strike in the midst of a midnight stroll of mine. Listening to a little Shane Koyczan I kept wondering what my kind of heaven would be like, and I expect I'd see the Walkman there more than a few times. I haven't really found any others here at UTK – mostly just drunks pardoned for their shenanigans, if only once – but there's still a chance there's another. Likely haven't been walking the right path. Hope you guys enjoy. In the middle of the next short story, and hopefully after that, I'll write my first novel. I'll catch you all later.
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Hello, everyone! The Wayword Writer here again with some more writing advice that hopefully won't land you in the third act of Rent. In the spirit of approaching November, I thought I'd do an entry for the puzzled and anxious. Now, for the growing and slowly evolving writer, there's always that one question looming in the distance. That itty-bitty piece of conjecture that's saved for those ready to make themselves true writers in the eyes of their community. That question is, simply put,

"Am I ready to write a novel?"

Now, for those of you that have left novels solitarily in the "to-read" category, this isn't all that pressing an issue. But it will be, so listen. Novels, when compared to short stories or poetry, have their minute details that make it much more challenging to write than either, but also quite a bit easier. For one, it's length. The average length of a novel can be around 50,000 words to nearly three times that, so the first hurdle is not only being able to WRITE such a monster, but being able to hang on long enough to even finish the first draft. And then the second, and likely the third. It's going to drain you in every sense of the word, but hopefully, with a good editor and enough caffeine, it's accomplishable.

Away from the length, there's also the issue of keeping track of everything. I myself have come across the problem of losing my origins when writing a short story, so making sure I don't forget where I started is probably going to be my greatest challenge in writing whatever I decide is going to be my first book. For those of you that don't think this is even decently important, what's the deadliest plague to ever be found in the pages of a novel? THE PLOT HOLE, and forgetting where the heck you decided to begin your story can leave you in a place that will give you no ending. So remember the tracks you've left behind. Dusting can wait till when the book is finished.

"Hey, I thought you said this was easier than writing a short story!" A few of you are probably screaming. And allow me to get to that, you impatient twerps.

Now, it stands to reason that the more space you have, the more freedom you have to work with it. With the aforementioned scale of a novel, more than a few things can be established with greater tact and excellence than one would be able to in a short story. Character and scenery come to mind, as I always have a problem establishing, if nothing else, the former. It's not easy making readers care for someone when you've got all of two-thousand words to do it. While this certainly isn't much, it will lift more than a ton of weight off of the writers shoulders now that they have the time and space to do whatever they want.

One final little token in the world of making novels is that they aren't quite as specialized as the short story. Not only that, but one can find more people to help out with the process. Cover artists, editors, agents; all of them are alive, willing, able, and thirsty for some more action. So when you've got your novel, go explosive with it. Find as many people as you can; collect the pitch rejections and create a monument, and when you get published, burn it with such a cry that you incite fear in everyone to the point where they can never refuse to NOT publish you.

This is the Wayword Writer saying I'm not feeling too well, so I'm going to go finish my nap...


Alright, so I’ve written about zero to negative five entries that have anything to do with writing. Considering this egregious lacking of decent material, I think it’s high time I wrote a legitimate discourse on, I don't know, WRITING. Today’s rant will be on one particularly famous sin in writing that, for the longest time, I’ve had trouble overcoming: PURPLE. FUCKING. PROSE.

That’s right, everyone. That big, fat consonant phrase, purple prose. For the unfamiliar, novice, or just plain clueless, purple prose is a particular style of writing in which the writer gets a little carried away with his/her descriptions. And by a little, I mean EXPANSION RATE EQUAL TO THAT OF THE UNIVERSE carried away. This could mean a number of things; overly-descriptive, archaic language, obtusely intricate metaphors (I’M LOOKING AT YOU, FALL IN OUR STARS), and so on. I’d oblige to fetch more than a few examples from works that I know, but I believe that for this post to hold any value, I need to examine my own work. And thankfully, my latest piece offers more than a few violaceous sections to work with.

See here:The rocks vanished before a tempest of flame, their forms whited away by a ruby red death sentence.

Short, yes, but it’s simple enough of an example so that I can properly present my point.

Now, for those, eh… jarred, by that statement, I was basically saying that the rocks were consumed by fire, obliterating them entirely. However, it’s how it’s described that makes it purple prose. It’s not necessarily long, but it’s flashy. It’s gaudy. It’s UNBEARABLE for a sentence that’s simply describing a couple of pebbles being burned by a dragon. Don’t worry, I’m going somewhere with this.

The problem with purple prose is not just how flourished it is, but also, how it’s describing a detail that would be perfectly readable if written otherwise. Yes, it makes it sound far more interesting than it is, but most people aren’t aesthetic-whores that loaf around reading nothing because it doesn’t send them on an LSD-pseudo trip within the first five paragraphs.

Now, of course you’re asking “Well, what the hell do I do to avoid this?” This is where things get a little tricky. Purple prose is a lot like obscenity; the old “I’ll know it when I see it” phrase comes to mind when either topic is under scrutiny. And that’s also part of the problem. I pride myself on my expansive vocabulary, and I rarely know when I’m taking it a step too far. So what do I have to say to this?

Well, read your own work. If you spot a word or phrase that might be a bit too ornate, carve the edges a bit. I’m not saying dumb it down, but make it fit for the scenario. Every word in your work has a place; make sure they fit properly before you show everyone what you’ve made. If you don’t, I don’t think even Picasso will be able to decipher what mess you’ve made. Or maybe I’m thinking of Lewis Carrol… Ah, writing, painting; there’s not much difference.

So, that’s it for today’s rant. Feel free to ask me about any questions you may have. Heck, message me if you want me to talk about a topic or two. I MIGHT JUST DO IT. For now, this is The Wayword Writer saying GAH, MY FREAKING HEAD HURTS, WHERE’S THE ADVIL?!


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Hello, everyone! The Wayword Writer here again with some more writing advice that hopefully won't land you in the third act of Rent. In the spirit of approaching November, I thought I'd do an entry for the puzzled and anxious. Now, for the growing and slowly evolving writer, there's always that one question looming in the distance. That itty-bitty piece of conjecture that's saved for those ready to make themselves true writers in the eyes of their community. That question is, simply put,

"Am I ready to write a novel?"

Now, for those of you that have left novels solitarily in the "to-read" category, this isn't all that pressing an issue. But it will be, so listen. Novels, when compared to short stories or poetry, have their minute details that make it much more challenging to write than either, but also quite a bit easier. For one, it's length. The average length of a novel can be around 50,000 words to nearly three times that, so the first hurdle is not only being able to WRITE such a monster, but being able to hang on long enough to even finish the first draft. And then the second, and likely the third. It's going to drain you in every sense of the word, but hopefully, with a good editor and enough caffeine, it's accomplishable.

Away from the length, there's also the issue of keeping track of everything. I myself have come across the problem of losing my origins when writing a short story, so making sure I don't forget where I started is probably going to be my greatest challenge in writing whatever I decide is going to be my first book. For those of you that don't think this is even decently important, what's the deadliest plague to ever be found in the pages of a novel? THE PLOT HOLE, and forgetting where the heck you decided to begin your story can leave you in a place that will give you no ending. So remember the tracks you've left behind. Dusting can wait till when the book is finished.

"Hey, I thought you said this was easier than writing a short story!" A few of you are probably screaming. And allow me to get to that, you impatient twerps.

Now, it stands to reason that the more space you have, the more freedom you have to work with it. With the aforementioned scale of a novel, more than a few things can be established with greater tact and excellence than one would be able to in a short story. Character and scenery come to mind, as I always have a problem establishing, if nothing else, the former. It's not easy making readers care for someone when you've got all of two-thousand words to do it. While this certainly isn't much, it will lift more than a ton of weight off of the writers shoulders now that they have the time and space to do whatever they want.

One final little token in the world of making novels is that they aren't quite as specialized as the short story. Not only that, but one can find more people to help out with the process. Cover artists, editors, agents; all of them are alive, willing, able, and thirsty for some more action. So when you've got your novel, go explosive with it. Find as many people as you can; collect the pitch rejections and create a monument, and when you get published, burn it with such a cry that you incite fear in everyone to the point where they can never refuse to NOT publish you.

This is the Wayword Writer saying I'm not feeling too well, so I'm going to go finish my nap...

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AnUnfoldedPaperTiger
Ryan Adams
Artist | Student | Literature
United States
A slightly less clever man than a clever man, I'm just the writer trying to writer himself, first off, a good bio, and second off, a place in the history books. Give a lexicon and I will weave for you tales that will sing aria's of imagination and stardust. You wanna ride with me? You best be ready to surf the winds because my head's in the cloud's an the only time when it lands is when I go to dream, baby. If you think you can handle that, then climb on board and set your compass to wherever you so please.

To those of you who wish to contact me, my email addresses can be found as such.

My social: aredmcguffin@gmail.com

My professional: ryan.adams.writer@gmail.com
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:iconmulluane:
Mulluane Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2014
Thanks for the fav!
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:iconanunfoldedpapertiger:
AnUnfoldedPaperTiger Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2014  Student Writer
Oh, it's nothing.
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:iconwintersoul2468:
wintersoul2468 Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Student General Artist
Thanks for the fave :D
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:iconanunfoldedpapertiger:
AnUnfoldedPaperTiger Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Student Writer
Ah, it's nothing.
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:iconwintersoul2468:
wintersoul2468 Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Student General Artist
It's not nothing. Seriously thank you. I really appreciate it :)
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:iconanunfoldedpapertiger:
AnUnfoldedPaperTiger Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Student Writer
Then you're welcome. What all did you like about the piece, anyway?
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(1 Reply)
:iconzstew2:
zstew2 Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Happy birthday :party: 
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:iconanunfoldedpapertiger:
AnUnfoldedPaperTiger Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2014  Student Writer
Thanks!
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Caen-N Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2014
Happy Birthday :cake:
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:iconanunfoldedpapertiger:
AnUnfoldedPaperTiger Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2014  Student Writer
Thank you!
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