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About Literature / Student Member Ryan AdamsMale/United States Groups :iconwe-arethewallflowers: We-AreTheWallFlowers
 
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Hey, you guys. It's The Wayword Writer again and I know it's been a while. First off, no, I did not complete NaNoWriMo. I only made it about two chapters into the novel, but I plan to get back to it. I'll likely start again at the start of January, and start a month-by-month schedule where I work on the novel for one month and then transfer to short stories and other projects I want to get to. At least that's how it's supposed to go. But more importantly, I want to show you all something. Now, as a writer, I'm always looking to get published. This means that the writing that I produce will end up getting sent to journals or publicists or people that just like posting good writing and, if I'm that good and just a little bit lucky, I'll end up with my work in the (more) public view. What I want to show you guys is a comment an editor from Polyphony HS gave me after review The Walkman. This is incredibly important, mainly because editors don't give feedback on work they consider for publication. And I really wanted you guys to see this. So, here it is. The general gist of it, at least.

Thank you for submitting to Polyphony HS! This was a very unique poem, I’m certain I’ve never seen this topic before and your use of paragraphs to tell the poem in a story like pattern is uncommon for poems. You had some beautiful descriptions and metaphors in here— my favorites being the lines about the Walkman’s footsteps and hair. However I do have a few problems with this poem. Firstly- it feels like two poems. You start off on a really interesting note about how a dancer is fluid but not water, and it’s beautiful but seems to have nothing to do with the next part of your poem about the Walkman. You sort of connect the two by saying dancers aren’t water but the Walkman is and this brings me to my second problem: you never explain why the Walkman is like water. You spend a third of your poem leading up to something you never address. To be honest, I think the poem would work better without the first stanza. I would suggest either working the topic of water and fluidness into the stanzas about the Walkman, or replacing the first stanza one about the Walkman. Perhaps you could start with a question like: “Who is the Walkman?” Then immediately progressing into, “He isn’t made of wiring…” Other than this topic shift, I found your poem well-written and intriguing, keep writing and submitting!

I wanted to point this out because of one line in particular. The very second and very last line of the entire review. Words like unique and intriguing get tossed around, and it's what makes me feel even more special when I read it. Not only do I know that I'm doing what I want to do, but I'm being taught how to do it better. That's what feedback is all about. I like to compliments and the "nice jobs", but nice can only go so far. I want to be different, revolutionary. I want to know what it's like to be able to not know what a boundary line or border is, and be able to effectively put anything into a story in such a way that it seems to enhance it because of how foreign the concept is, rather than detract from the narrative and setting because how random it's inclusion seems. So, talk to me, people. Or give me suggestions on how I can talk to you. I'll have a short story for all of you within the next to weeks, hopefully. But for now, this is The Wayword Writer saying that FINALS. FUCKING. BLOW.

P.S: Thanks for the 5000 views, you guys. Let's try and double that number.
Hello, everyone. It's me again with a bit of a warning. Not necessarily an excuse, but an explanation. I'm currently working on my first novel (the first chapter is almost complete), and I haven't had the time and concentration required to work on anything else. If anything, I'll likely work on other projects on the weekends when I don't have any classes to swallow up the majority of my day. So, just giving you all fair disclosure on why I may not be so active around the site. Let's hope that this thing gets done soon, and with ample quality to spare.
Well, guess I need to make this short. I'm heading to the Cardfight!! Vanguard Regionals event tomorrow, and I'm willing to accept all challengers who dare approach me, in both words and waged mental combat. So come one! Come all! See if you can take me down. I've got nothing to lose, after all.
A dancer is not water. It's not because they aren't
Fluid – they're nothing if not fluid – but they have a
Form. A series of steps, twists and turns in resulting in
A masterpiece. Some may call it art. I call it a building plan.
And it can be beautiful, make no assumptions that
I'm saying it can't. What I am saying is that
If you're looking for water, go talk to the walkman.

He isn't made of wiring and plastic, but he'll still
Play music, if you can share the tun. He never really has
A destination, but he's always got someplace to go.
Like a loose Brick picked out of the cement filling its cracks
He doesn't go with everyone else. He belongs on the earth,
Tumbling and taking step after step till the only one's left
Are those at the foot of his grave. He's restless; like the trigger
Of a marathon revolver he seeks to be let go. He's not sure
Where he'll go, but he doesn't care. He's the kind of guy that
Never cuts his hair because he thinks that the moment he brushes
The curl out of his face makes seeing what he's seeing all the more
Special. Because curing obscurity with the vaccine called clarity
Is the only thing that makes him stop walking.

He doesn't talk about what he sees. He merely tells people he meets
"Come walking with me, and you'll see what I've seen."
The Walkman
Hello, everyone! I've got some more poetry for you that happened to strike in the midst of a midnight stroll of mine. Listening to a little Shane Koyczan I kept wondering what my kind of heaven would be like, and I expect I'd see the Walkman there more than a few times. I haven't really found any others here at UTK – mostly just drunks pardoned for their shenanigans, if only once – but there's still a chance there's another. Likely haven't been walking the right path. Hope you guys enjoy. In the middle of the next short story, and hopefully after that, I'll write my first novel. I'll catch you all later.
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Hello, everyone! The Wayword Writer here again with some more writing advice that hopefully won't land you in the third act of Rent. In the spirit of approaching November, I thought I'd do an entry for the puzzled and anxious. Now, for the growing and slowly evolving writer, there's always that one question looming in the distance. That itty-bitty piece of conjecture that's saved for those ready to make themselves true writers in the eyes of their community. That question is, simply put,

"Am I ready to write a novel?"

Now, for those of you that have left novels solitarily in the "to-read" category, this isn't all that pressing an issue. But it will be, so listen. Novels, when compared to short stories or poetry, have their minute details that make it much more challenging to write than either, but also quite a bit easier. For one, it's length. The average length of a novel can be around 50,000 words to nearly three times that, so the first hurdle is not only being able to WRITE such a monster, but being able to hang on long enough to even finish the first draft. And then the second, and likely the third. It's going to drain you in every sense of the word, but hopefully, with a good editor and enough caffeine, it's accomplishable.

Away from the length, there's also the issue of keeping track of everything. I myself have come across the problem of losing my origins when writing a short story, so making sure I don't forget where I started is probably going to be my greatest challenge in writing whatever I decide is going to be my first book. For those of you that don't think this is even decently important, what's the deadliest plague to ever be found in the pages of a novel? THE PLOT HOLE, and forgetting where the heck you decided to begin your story can leave you in a place that will give you no ending. So remember the tracks you've left behind. Dusting can wait till when the book is finished.

"Hey, I thought you said this was easier than writing a short story!" A few of you are probably screaming. And allow me to get to that, you impatient twerps.

Now, it stands to reason that the more space you have, the more freedom you have to work with it. With the aforementioned scale of a novel, more than a few things can be established with greater tact and excellence than one would be able to in a short story. Character and scenery come to mind, as I always have a problem establishing, if nothing else, the former. It's not easy making readers care for someone when you've got all of two-thousand words to do it. While this certainly isn't much, it will lift more than a ton of weight off of the writers shoulders now that they have the time and space to do whatever they want.

One final little token in the world of making novels is that they aren't quite as specialized as the short story. Not only that, but one can find more people to help out with the process. Cover artists, editors, agents; all of them are alive, willing, able, and thirsty for some more action. So when you've got your novel, go explosive with it. Find as many people as you can; collect the pitch rejections and create a monument, and when you get published, burn it with such a cry that you incite fear in everyone to the point where they can never refuse to NOT publish you.

This is the Wayword Writer saying I'm not feeling too well, so I'm going to go finish my nap...

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Hey, you guys. It's The Wayword Writer again and I know it's been a while. First off, no, I did not complete NaNoWriMo. I only made it about two chapters into the novel, but I plan to get back to it. I'll likely start again at the start of January, and start a month-by-month schedule where I work on the novel for one month and then transfer to short stories and other projects I want to get to. At least that's how it's supposed to go. But more importantly, I want to show you all something. Now, as a writer, I'm always looking to get published. This means that the writing that I produce will end up getting sent to journals or publicists or people that just like posting good writing and, if I'm that good and just a little bit lucky, I'll end up with my work in the (more) public view. What I want to show you guys is a comment an editor from Polyphony HS gave me after review The Walkman. This is incredibly important, mainly because editors don't give feedback on work they consider for publication. And I really wanted you guys to see this. So, here it is. The general gist of it, at least.

Thank you for submitting to Polyphony HS! This was a very unique poem, I’m certain I’ve never seen this topic before and your use of paragraphs to tell the poem in a story like pattern is uncommon for poems. You had some beautiful descriptions and metaphors in here— my favorites being the lines about the Walkman’s footsteps and hair. However I do have a few problems with this poem. Firstly- it feels like two poems. You start off on a really interesting note about how a dancer is fluid but not water, and it’s beautiful but seems to have nothing to do with the next part of your poem about the Walkman. You sort of connect the two by saying dancers aren’t water but the Walkman is and this brings me to my second problem: you never explain why the Walkman is like water. You spend a third of your poem leading up to something you never address. To be honest, I think the poem would work better without the first stanza. I would suggest either working the topic of water and fluidness into the stanzas about the Walkman, or replacing the first stanza one about the Walkman. Perhaps you could start with a question like: “Who is the Walkman?” Then immediately progressing into, “He isn’t made of wiring…” Other than this topic shift, I found your poem well-written and intriguing, keep writing and submitting!

I wanted to point this out because of one line in particular. The very second and very last line of the entire review. Words like unique and intriguing get tossed around, and it's what makes me feel even more special when I read it. Not only do I know that I'm doing what I want to do, but I'm being taught how to do it better. That's what feedback is all about. I like to compliments and the "nice jobs", but nice can only go so far. I want to be different, revolutionary. I want to know what it's like to be able to not know what a boundary line or border is, and be able to effectively put anything into a story in such a way that it seems to enhance it because of how foreign the concept is, rather than detract from the narrative and setting because how random it's inclusion seems. So, talk to me, people. Or give me suggestions on how I can talk to you. I'll have a short story for all of you within the next to weeks, hopefully. But for now, this is The Wayword Writer saying that FINALS. FUCKING. BLOW.

P.S: Thanks for the 5000 views, you guys. Let's try and double that number.

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AnUnfoldedPaperTiger
Ryan Adams
Artist | Student | Literature
United States
A slightly less clever man than a clever man, I'm just the writer trying to writer himself, first off, a good bio, and second off, a place in the history books. Give a lexicon and I will weave for you tales that will sing aria's of imagination and stardust. You wanna ride with me? You best be ready to surf the winds because my head's in the cloud's an the only time when it lands is when I go to dream, baby. If you think you can handle that, then climb on board and set your compass to wherever you so please.

To those of you who wish to contact me, my email addresses can be found as such.

My social: aredmcguffin@gmail.com

My professional: ryan.adams.writer@gmail.com
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:iconvfreie:
VFreie Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2014
Hi, and welcome to :iconthewrittenrevolution: theWrittenRevolution!
There are lots of things you can get involved in:

Bullet; Red we post monthly writing prompts (that include prizes, and a chat event during the month to help people with their pieces),

Bullet; Black publishing opportunities from other sites (whenever we come across one!),

Bullet; White we have a monthly feature that includes a deserving member, two of the best critiques we've seen during the month, and two helpful writing resources,

Bullet; Red a monthly affiliates feature of two Literature groups,

Bullet; Black and a biweekly-ish article in which one of our admins gives an in-depth critique to one of our members' work that hasn't received much feedback.


We'll soon be reviving our chatroom with weekly activities, so stay tuned for that too. :D (Big Grin)

We also have Facebook and Twitter accounts. On our profile page you will find links to the latest of all the activities I listed up here and to our social networks that will help you keep updated, so feel free to look around and ask if you have any questions, we're here to help!

Welcome to the revolution. I salute you!
Reply
:iconmulluane:
Mulluane Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2014
Thanks for the fav!
Reply
:iconanunfoldedpapertiger:
AnUnfoldedPaperTiger Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2014  Student Writer
Oh, it's nothing.
Reply
:iconwintersoul2468:
wintersoul2468 Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Student General Artist
Thanks for the fave :D
Reply
:iconanunfoldedpapertiger:
AnUnfoldedPaperTiger Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Student Writer
Ah, it's nothing.
Reply
:iconwintersoul2468:
wintersoul2468 Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Student General Artist
It's not nothing. Seriously thank you. I really appreciate it :)
Reply
:iconanunfoldedpapertiger:
AnUnfoldedPaperTiger Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Student Writer
Then you're welcome. What all did you like about the piece, anyway?
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconzstew2:
zstew2 Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Happy birthday :party: 
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:iconanunfoldedpapertiger:
AnUnfoldedPaperTiger Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2014  Student Writer
Thanks!
Reply
:iconcaen-n:
Caen-N Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2014
Happy Birthday :cake:
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